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Articles

Europe bans Allergan implants linked to rare cancer

Breast implants made by Allergan that have been linked to an uncommon form of cancer are being taken off the market in Europe, The New York Times reports French authorities announced. The implants, which have a textured or slightly roughened surface, rather than a smooth covering, cannot be manufactured or sold in Europe for the time being, and the ones kept on hand at health centres are being recalled.

According to the report, France’s National Agency for the Safety of Medicines and Health Products said it had not “identified any immediate risk for the health of women carrying the implants concerned,” and it did not mention the unusual cancer. But the products, particularly the textured ones, have been linked to a disease called breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. The lymphoma is not breast cancer, but is a malignancy of the immune system that develops years after the implant surgery, often seven or eight years later. Removing the implant usually gets rid of the disease. But in some cases, the cancer spread and women died.

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RSNA 2018: Mammography Screening Beyond Age 75

Women aged 75 years and older may benefit from continued screening mammograms because of the comparatively high incidence of breast cancer found in this age group, according to a study presented at the Annual Meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) (Abstract SSA01-04).

“Ongoing debate exists regarding the age to cease screening mammography,” said Stamatia V. Destounis, MD, radiologist at Elizabeth Wende Breast Care, LLC, in a statement. “Our findings provide important data demonstrating that there is value in screening women over 75 because there is a considerable incidence of breast cancer.”

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Yes, a Pregnancy After Breast Cancer Is Safe

CHICAGO – It's a finding that has been called "comforting," "reassuring," and "good news," here at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2017 Annual Meeting. The warm words are for the long-term results of a study of women who became pregnant after an early stage breast cancer diagnosis.

Lead study author Matteo Lambertini, MD, a medical oncologist at the Institut Jules Bordet in Brussels, Belgium, reported that, after a median follow-up of about 12 years from cancer diagnosis among 1200 women, there was no difference in disease-free survival between women who became pregnant and those who did not (hazard ratio [HR], 0.85; P = .15).

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Exercise Improves Cognitive Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

Physical activity appears to clear away brain fog and significantly improve cognitive function in breast cancer survivors experiencing poor working memory and executive function following chemotherapy, according to researchers.

In a national study of 299 women with a mean duration of 8 years since chemotherapy for breast cancer, objective measures showed that moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was directly associated with significantly fewer cancer-related symptoms, such as fatigue (P < .001), say Diane K. Ehlers, from the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and colleagues.

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